Hamilton water to wastewater spend 2018/19

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Disclaimer: the numbers used in this post come from council fund project lists. It looks to me that the way people analyse the counting changes, also my data is copy and type, not copy and paste. So please do a check;

In the briefing note for the Council meeting on Wed 6th Dec 2017 – 2018-28 10-year Plan – page 172: The funded Capital Programme spend on wastewater and water for the plan for 2018-28 was $457,508,506. The 27 March Council Report Attachment 8 Draft Capital Projects List 12-3-18 (D2625967) spend totals $592,820,000; a 29% increase in just 3 months.

The 10-Year Plan 2018-28 Consultation Document (page 11) puts water at $285m & wastewater at $358m, totalling $643,000,000. This post uses funded project lists for benchmarking, see end of post for examples from 1999-2019, 2009-19 & 2012-12.

Back last century, Hamilton’s Strategic plan 1999-2019 budget for year 2018/19 (page 70 & 71) approved a budget for water $4,274,000, wastewater $2,954,000: total $7,228,000 ($10,788,392 inflation added).
Looking back a decade, in the 2009-19 long term plan the spending for year 2018/19 on wastewater and water was $20,167,000 ($23,252,760 inflation added) compared to the latest plan for year 2018/19 of $72,319,000 which is an increase of over 200%.

Year 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 2018-25
Long Term Plan $000 $000 $000 $000 $000
1999-19 $10,788
2009/19 $23,253
2012/22 $31,894 $31,740 $32,654 $24,494
2015/25 $243,781 75% Increase
2018/28 $72,319 $90,311 $73,974 $58,923 $427,917

The numbers above shown as single years don’t give a balanced picture, as long term plans are rewritten  and projects’ funding dates change, so below I’ve graphed each long term plan’s budgeted total 10 year spend on Water and Wastewater as single $k values along with population data, and the future population council is planning for as stated in the 2018/28 long term plan.

What I’m seeing is a growth plan that pulls the trend line up away from population growth, but even more concerning is the accelerating cost of adding new water/wastewater infrastructure.

The challenge of ‘Deciding where our next big housing area will be’ should not be about pushing the city wider and wider; it is about when do we start looking at slimming existing properties that are close to existing shopping and service centres, so that they are used more frequently and their efficiency will rise.

Link to Former 10-Year Plans

Examples of project list I’m using for benchmarking.

 

 

Submit on the Hamilton City Council 10-year Plan 2018-2028

Have your say: Hamilton’s future and Transport

As you may be aware, there are 2 important submissions underway, concerning Hamilton city’s near future as well as national transport policy. In this post we cover the upcoming Hamilton 2018-2028 10-Year Plan in some detail, and link to the Cycle Action Network’s guide for submitting on the 2018 Government Policy Statement (GPS) on Transport.

Hamilton 2018-2018 10-Year Plan

Hamilton City Council is inviting submissions on their draft 10-year plan (subtitled “Planning for a growing city”) for the years 2018-2028. The Draft 10-Year Plan consultation document is available at https://bit.ly/2F6wPUJ), and presents a fairly simplified overview of main spending areas broken down into a series of ‘challenges’. Notable in this plan is the steep increase in rates proposed, although the council is presenting this as a ‘correction’, bringing Hamilton rates more into line with other NZ cities’ rates. Nonetheless, as might be expected the proposed rates increases are proving unpopular. On the other hand, the current rate of population growth is challenging the capacity of the city’s infrastructure, particularly the roading network, which is steadily becoming more congested.

Submissions can be made via http://www.hamilton.govt.nz/our-council/10-year-plan/Pages/default.aspx, or by emailing 10yearplan@hamilton.govt.nz.

But I don’t have a lot of time!

What should I include in my submission to show my support for cycling, walking, and public transport?

Note that we have chosen to focus our coverage on areas we think are of particular interest to the aims of this blog and hopefully it’s readership. You are of course free to comment on other aspects of the 10-year plan in your submission.

Many people are concerned about the proposed rates rises in the 10-year plan, so don’t be afraid to let the council know your thoughts on that as part of your submission, and feel free to include any or all of the below, with whatever tweaks you feel appropriate, in your submission:

I support the council’s recent adoption of Vision Zero, with a target of zero deaths and view to minimising serious injury to people trying to get around our city.

I support the Biking Plan, including the following projects:
- school link, years 1-4
- city-wide biking signage for year 1
- biking connectivity projects, but I request these be prioritised towards the first years of the 10-year plan
- central city, but request this is brought forward to year 3 or 4
- University route, but request this is brought forward to year 3 or 4

If not included in the above, I request that the council develop a programme of works to remedy the urgent safety issues confronting people trying to access the CBD by active transport modes (identified in this recent Hamilton Urban Blog post https://wp.me/p4xhCi-zH).

I also support these other transport projects:
- Te Awa South River Ride for year 2
- Whitiora Bridge shared footpath and Kirikiriroa bridge widening
- Rotokauri rail platform and park and ride
- All proposed public transport priority and amenity improvements, including transport centre rejuvenation
- River Plan project - accessible pedestrian and cycle bridge connecting the east of city and the central city.

N.B.: it’s by no means necessary to speak on behalf of your submission, but the opportunity is open to all and if you do it’s more likely to make an impact. If you think you’d like to do this, let the council know in your submission that you’d like to speak.

National Transport Policy is Changing

At the national level, the Government Policy Statement on Transport for 2018 has introduced a 248% increase in funding for walking and cycling improvements, reflecting the new government’s emphasis on peoples’ mobility over the mere movement of vehicles, along with sustainability and health benefits.

Our recommendations for the challenges that are of particular concern to us are below, in order of their relevance to the goal of bringing about a city that is healthier, more liveable, and sustainable.

Challenge 3: Improving Hamilton’s transport system

The new government has signalled a transport policy shift from a singular focus on moving motor vehicles toward a more diverse range of transport modes reflecting individuals’ mobility. We recommend the council give particular focus to removing the barriers to alternative transport modes – as the roads become increasingly congested as a result of an increasing number of car journeys, growth in cycling, walking, and public transport is inevitable. The council should capitalise on the growing interest in cycling among young and old, along with the advent of e-Bikes. This is against a background demographic change whereby younger people increasingly see car ownership as an unnecessary burden.

The removal of pain points affecting alternative transport modes is a priority to maximise the return on investment for these modes, and enable greater numbers of people to get around without journey times increasing disproportionately. Some of these pain points are:

  • Lack of connectivity between sections of the city’s cycling and walking network
  • Barriers to safe access to the CBD for active transport modes (see recent Hamilton Urban Blog post https://wp.me/p4xhCi-zH)
  • Lack of way-finding signage for those using bicycles or walking

Vision Zero

I support the council’s recent adoption of Vision Zero, with a a target of zero deaths and view to minimising serious injury to people trying to get around our city.

Proposed Projects

  • Support Biking Plan – school link, years 1-4
  • Support Biking Plan – city-wide biking signage for year 1
  • Support Biking Plan – biking connectivity projects, but request making these connections is prioritised towards the first years of the 10-year plan
  • Support Biking Plan – central city, but request this is brought forward to year 3 or 4
  • Support Biking Plan – University route, but request this is brought forward to year 3 or 4
  • Support Te Awa South River Ride for year 2
  • Support Whitiora Bridge shared footpath and Kirikiriroa bridge widening
  • Support Rotokauri rail platform and park and ride
  • Support all public transport priority and amenity improvements, including transport centre rejuvenation

If not included in the above, I request that the council develop a programme of works to remedy the urgent safety issues confronting people trying to access the CBD by active transport modes (identified in this recent Hamilton Urban Blog post https://wp.me/p4xhCi-zH).

I also support the accessible pedestrian and cycle bridge connecting the east of city and the central city, originally from the River Plan project.

Depending on your view on the council’s finances, you may want to support Option 3: invest 10% more. In light of the current rate of population growth, should the council  take advantage of the extra $9 million in NZTA subsidy in option 3?

Challenge 2: Deciding where Hamilton’s next big housing area will be

We support the development of quality infill housing that respects the character of the neighbourhood in which it is located. This gives more people the opportunity to live closer to the places they work and play, giving more options for moving around the city.

If we must open up greenfields land for growth, Peacocke seems the preferable option given its greater capacity and the government’s Housing Infrastructure Fund support.

NZ Government 2018 Transport General Policy Statement

We strongly recommend that you submit on the NZ government 2018 transport GPS. The Cycle Action Network (CAN) have prepared this helpful guide giving some tips on how to write an effective submission:

https://can.org.nz/submission-guide-GPS2018

Please take the time to make yourself heard and let’s keep making Hamilton better.

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