Hamilton city centre – A 2013 Louis Wirth measure

Posted on by 0 comment

Louis Wirth (1897-1952) was a noted urban scholar who created a typology of urbanism that defines cities according to three factors

  1. Large population size
  2. Density of settlement
  3. Heterogeneity [diversity] of inhabitants and group life

Hamilton, with a population of over 100,000, is city-sized and it does have a good number of areas with population densities of over 3,000 people per square km, but no unit areas meeting the urban density benchmark of 10,000 persons per square mile [3,886 per square km] suggested by Mark Jefferson (see p6 in the reference below)

However, as Wirth stated, “The characterization of a community as urban on the basis of size alone is obviously arbitrary” (p5).

This brings us to heterogeneity, which can be interpreted as showing that something that is made up of many different elements, one example being a local dialect that has components from several different languages. Census data uses two measures for language, as illustrated in the examples below.

Louis Wirth also gives a further measure: ‘The foreign born and their children constitute nearly two-thirds of all the inhabitants of cities of one million and over. Their proportion in the urban population declines as the size of the city decreases, until in the rural areas they comprise only about one-sixth of the total population.’

Using factors 2 (Density), 3 (Heterogeneity using Language) and being foreign born, we can identify Hamilton’s most compact and diverse neighbourhoods.

Neighbourhood Density per/ha Multilingual % Foreign Born % Score
University 30.2 32 36 98.2
Hillcrest West 31.5 30 36 97.5
Silverdale 25.4 29 33 87.4
Hamilton Central 11.5 32 40 83.5
Insoll 33.3 30 19 82.3
Brymer 26.5 25 29 80.5
Melville 25.7 27 27 79.7
Hamilton East 24.9 25 29 78.9
Peachgrove 22.9 26 28 76.9
Huntington 20.9 24 31 75.9
Bader 20 28 27 75
Dinsdale South 25.8 16 13 74.8
Fairview Downs 29.5 24 19 72.5
Enderley 28.5 24 20 72.5
Porrit 17 29 26 72
Rototuna 21 21 29 71
Hamilton Lake 11.5 27 32 70.5
Horsham Downs 12 25 33 70
Chedworth 22.5 22 25 69.5
Grandview 34 20 15 69
Claudelands 20.4 23 25 68.4
Crawshaw 34.1 23 11 68.1
Swarbrick 28.6 22 17 67.6
Riverlea 15.7 22 28 65.7
Clarkin 23.8 23 18 64.8
Naylor 19.6 21 24 64.6
Nawton 26.2 20 17 63.2
Maeroa 25.7 20 16 61.7
Flagstaff 18.9 17 25 60.9
Sylvester 6.5 20 29 55.5
Frankton Junction 5.8 20 24 49.5
Temple View 4.2 22 16 42.2

While the University area does well in terms of compactness and diversity, the data also show that the Hamilton Central area is attracting the right type of people; it just needs more of them.

Reference: Wirth, L. (1938). Urbanism as a way of life. American Journal of Sociology, 44(1), 1-24. Retrieved from

http://choros.epfl.ch/files/content/sites/choros/files/shared/Enseignement/Sciences%20de%20la%20ville/11-12/Wirth%20-%20Urbanism.pdf

Category: CBD, Demographics, News, Planning

AA advocates for 30km/h speed limit

Posted on by 1 comment

30 km/h this is true, thanks to Brian Gibbons, the Chief Executive of the New Zealand Automobile Association, and Deputy President of FIA (Federation Internationale de l’Automobile) Automobile Mobility & Tourism, a position that sees him take a leadership role in a world-wide capacity. FIA has a global Membership of over 100 million individual club members.

The FIA identifies key priorities that must be addressed, and is supporting action for each through its grant programme and through advocacy initiatives, which include:

  • Prioritise pedestrians and cyclists in urban planning
  • #SlowDown: < 30 km/h speed limits on school routes and residential streets
  • By 2030, a safe and healthy journey to school for every child.

Here is a link to the relevant material: http://www.fiafoundation.org/blog/2017/february/ten-years-on-make-roads-safe-redux

Brian is 3 third from right in the group photo under the header

“In 2017 global road safety campaign priorities include a call for increased funding for road safety. … the FIA’s High Level Panel for Road Safety (below) are pushing for a UN Road Safety Fund, with FIA Foundation funding and advocacy support.”

More information about FIA from aa.co.nz affiliations fia

“Founded in 1904, the FIA is a non-profit making association.  Based in Paris, the FIA brings together 227 national motoring and sporting organisations from 132 countries. Its member clubs, of which the New Zealand Automobile Association is one, represent millions of motorists and their families.”

“The FIA is also the governing body for motor sport worldwide. It administers the rules and regulations for all international four-wheel motor sport including the FIA Formula One World Championship, FIA World Rally Championship and FIA World Touring Car Championship”

FIA also knows a bit about planning for Zero traffic fatalities.

“The Coalition is striving to end traffic fatalities in the United States within the next 30 years”

School route, Te Rapa Rd Hamilton: 60 km/h road.

End

Category: Advocacy, News, Safety