Hamilton train stations Bike & E-scooter Catchment

There are three proposed train stations in Hamilton: Rotokauri, Central, and Ruakura.

The two Hamilton to Auckland start-up passenger services will each start with 4-carriage trains, able to carry 150 passengers each. (Link to KiwiRailBlog)

Stage 1 of the Rotokauri station has a budget of $2,246,000 (HCC Meeting 27 Aug 19 p14) for a park and ride development. This builds 105 car parks, at a nominal $21,000 per car park or $7,000 per passenger. Is this sustainable?

The first Comet bus arrives at the Base at 6.38am, three minutes before the last 6.41am morning train to Auckland. The first full Orbiter bus service arrives at Rotokauri after 7am. Is this sensible?

HCC Growth and Infrastructure Committee – Tuesday 27 August 2019 – page 21

Near a train station, it is normal to have the real estate dominated by bus stops, access routes, safety zones near the tracks, and open public space which includes ticket offices and neighbourhood-type shops. For Rotokauri, the car parking starts about 50m from the platform. In New Zealand, half of all walking trips are more than five minutes (NZTA Ped guide p12). On this basis, a ‘500m walk to the station’ sounds reasonable (Tetteroo p7). Real estate 50 to 500m from the platform could be dominated by car parking at both Rotokauri and Ruakura. At the new green belt central station, car parking is not an option.

The beauty of e-scooters is that they do not require parking and they have a trip distance of 2-3 km (Fitt, H., & Curl, A. (2019). For biking, research by Dutch Railway states that ‘over 45% of all train passengers arrive on their bikes’ and ‘that the distance they travel … is preferably up to 2 or 3 km, depending on the station (Tetteroo p42). This reach can be greater for strong and confident cyclists and the average trip length on an e-bike is about 1.5 times that of a normal bike within the same travel time, we can expect that the catchment areas can indeed be enlarged’ (Tetteroo p96).

For Hamilton, the focus is on people new to biking. ‘In order to facilitate multimodal mobility, it is therefore important that the entire multimodal trip is of high quality’ (Tetteroo p22), so a good 3+m wide shared-use path needs to radiate 3 km out from the station zone in all directions. The quality of the route surface and all curb cut-downs need to be comfortable for the smaller e-scooter wheels. For faster cyclists and e-bikes travelling at speeds over 20kmh on-road cycle lanes of no less than 2m width are needed. We must expect people new to biking to make mistakes. The routes need to feel direct, safe and be highly visible. Obstacle-free zones are the most important in this respect.

 

Tetteroo, E. (2015). Urban Cycling = HOD. A study of the relationship between urban planning and the hybrid bicycle-train system in Dutch planning practice. Thesis, Master City Developer (MCD 10) Erasmus University Rotterdam & Delft University of Technology. (Retrieved from https://thesis.eur.nl/pub/31751/Erik_Tetteroo_versie_juni_2015_versie_2.pdf)

Category: News

3 comments on “Hamilton train stations Bike & E-scooter Catchment

  1. > …[A] budget of $2,246,000 (HCC Meeting 27 Aug 19 p14) for a park and ride development. This builds 105 car parks, at a nominal $21,000 per car park or $7,000 per passenger. Is this sustainable?
    > The first Comet bus arrives at the Base at 6.38am, three minutes before the last 6.41am morning train to Auckland. The first full Orbiter bus service arrives at Rotokauri after 7am. Is this sensible?

    Very good questions. Surely an earlier Comet service is in order.

    And is the distance from the Comet stop to the railway platform walkable in less than 3 minutes?

    If Hamilton City Council wants this service to be successful, and to reduce the risk of it being an expensive flop, they need to optimise access to the station for non-drivers. Of course, it doesn’t help that most of the land surrounding The Base is not zoned residential, although, I heard Tainui were considering extending The Base with mixed-use development including apartments.

    • And furthermore, what’s the on-time performance of the Comet bus service, i.e. stats on how often it arrives at its final destination at the scheduled time.

  2. Can we move on from saying that shared paths are desirable and on road protected lanes are an adition. It’s completely backwards. On raod protected cycle lanes are the preferred provision, shared paths are the minimum acceptable solution.

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