Hamilton’s First bike plan – Anglesea St

Waikato Argus – ‘Cycling Tracks’ 13 Sep 1913 – ‘The Mayor said … He thought the time had come when they should lay down cycle tracks in Hamilton … Cr Speight was totally against the proposal … Cr Tristram said his experience was that cyclists deserved no consideration whatever … Cr McKinnon said … If they formed cycle tracks … they would have more trouble controlling the traffic than they had at present … Cr Hayter said he would like to see cyclists getting a fair chance. They had none at present against vehicle drivers … Cr Howden suggested that the committee should experiment with a track right along Anglesea Street’.

Hamilton Library photo Central city car park HCL_M00278.18

By the late 1960s *‘It was considered that the prediction of future cycle trip movements would be of little value and this item was omitted from the projection procedure’ even though ‘cycle trips amounted to 11%’ in travel mode data. *Hamilton transport study Basic data report: 1968 – (p29 & 38)

In the Hamilton Transport study April 1973 – Page 37-48

(p37) – Between 1968 and 1988 … CBA (Central Business Area) employment is projected to increase by 62 percent from 11,000 to 19,000 … an efficient transport system for the movement of people and goods is essential. (p39) … To provide adequate capacity by 1988, forecasted traffic will require about 10 to 12 north and south bound traffic lanes on Victoria, Anglesea and Tristram Streets … (p42) With further development in the CBA beyond 1988, additional capacity could be provided by widening Anglesea and/or Tristram Streets.

Hamilton Transport Study April 1973 – page 42 – by Beca, Carter, Hollings and Ferner/Wilbur Smith and Associates

The Hamilton report, by the University of Auckland school of Architecture May 1989 (p123) – ‘Anglesea Street and Tristram Street could remain as the heavy traffic bypass, but it is essential to upgrade road facilities so they do not destroy communities or natural environment … (p125) we know there are about 20,000 residents who regularly ride bikes. During a five year period there were 187 accidents including 2 fatalities’. (Cycling in Hamilton, Works Department 1988)

Hamilton city centre local plan Oct 2012 – page 13

There was some hope for Anglesea St in the Hamilton City Centre Local Area Plan, April 2012 – (p18) ‘The nature of Anglesea Street will change from vehicle oriented to a mixed use street with increased pedestrian priority and amenity … (p74) Continue to implement the public realm master-plan that has been developed including the creation of a northern entry boulevard along Anglesea Street with pedestrian and cycling provision.’

Submission to HCC for Separated Cycleways on Anglesea St

In 2014 “A section of one of Hamilton’s busiest CBD streets will have a new more modern look and feel after much-needed maintenance and renewals work is completed’. The council was again asked (link to Max post & Ashley post) if it could include cycle lanes. The ‘modern look’ feels the same as in the 1960s *‘It was considered that the prediction of future cycle trip movements would be of little value and this item was omitted from the projection procedure’

After over a century since Cr Hayter said ‘he would like to see cyclists getting a fair chance. They had none at present against vehicle drivers’ and Cr Howden suggested that ‘the committee should experiment with a track right along Anglesea Street’ the image above shows the first bit of green with bike symbol. As the image above shows it is not impossible to have cycling infrastructure along Anglesea St to give existing cyclists a fair chance; they have none at present against vehicle drivers.

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