Category Archives: CBD

Lunch in Venlo NL

The other week my wife and I stopped for lunch in the city of Venlo, on our way to Wuppertal from Schipol airport. Venlo has a population of just over 101,000 people, with a population density of about 800 people per km2. On leaving the rail station we saw the Venlo bus station, which services 3 bus routes and 8 regional routes (Hamilton has over 20 routes). The station has drive-through berths, allowing bus stops to be located in a compact area, and also can allow buses to wait with their front destination sign facing the direction passengers will arrive from. I like the way the Dutch design tidy and uncluttered areas in a way very few other designers can do.

The city has a reputation for being Green. I did notice the electric bus charging stations, and but sadly I didn’t have time to look into their ‘cradle-to-cradle’ (C2C) principles; in the future I would like to explore this more, but for now here is an introductory explanation

‘The Venlo region was the first in the world to embrace the principles of cradle-to-cradle (C2C). It is a method that minimises the environmental impact of products by employing sustainable production, operation, and disposal practices, so that products can be 100% recyclable and waste can serve as a raw material.’

Dutch cities are nicer than German cities. Venlo being close to the German and being part of the large Verkhrsverbund* Rhein-Ruhr (VRR) ticketing area, it attracts many visitors from there, and on the Wednesday we were there the city streets and squares were pleasantly busy. (*means ‘Transport network’)

What I did make time for was to take a look at Maasboulevard, promoted as ‘the place to meet’. I’ve visited many cities with river promenades; on sunny days these places attract plenty of people coming out to enjoy the open space and to people-watch, which is the reason why they need width. There is also evidence that residential apartments/homes with water views attract a premium, and add eyes on the street when retail has closed or on quiet days when it is not so sunny.

 

The day we visited it was a nice but quiet day on the river promenade, so we had a great lunch where most others were meeting, in the more active old market place.

The last Apple tree

‘The trees to be removed are seven ash trees and one apple, on the eastern side of the road near Hamilton District Court’ Link 

Hamilton city council reason for Apple tree removal. (from email 19 Sep)

 “The Apple tree was removed due to its poor health and form. It was assessed as a potential hazard to the road and footpath. Because the Apple tree was an old variety that had been at this site for a long time, Hamilton City Council took cuttings from the Apple tree prior to its removal.  These are growing at the nursery to be planted around the city in future planting programs”

Fruit trees in Hamilton central area go back a long way (see Hamilton Maori Landmarks p48).

“Peach trees that grew around the vicinity of the pa along what is now Victoria Street”. Note the word ‘that’; they are gone. After some 200 years of fruit trees in Hamilton’s centre, in September 2018 the last fruit tree was gone.