Category Archives: Cycle infrastructure

Western Rail Trail Spring 2018

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Quoting from Hamilton Bike Plan

Western Rail Trail: Providing an off road connection from the south west suburbs to the central city, parallel to the rail track.

It will [does] provide a safe biking route for commuters and an attractive recreational route for families wanting to enjoy a picnic at the Lake. The route will be promoted and [has] signage installed, along with biking facilities such as bike parks and seating, to make the experience easy and enjoyable.

The Western Rail Trail will provide a connection from the south west suburbs of Hamilton through to the city. It will enable future links to Lake Rotoroa, the rail station, Frankton and the city’s Seddon Park and Waikato Stadium.

Grey St too be 75% safer

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Over the past 7 years no less than seven people have died travelling to/from/within the Hamilton CBD.
Grey St, Hamilton East has recorded ZERO fatalities.

Better than that, the people from the Hamilton East Community Trust teamed up with HCC, NZTA and WRC to be one of six case studies around Australia and New Zealand being assessed by a team of Austroads traffic safety experts.
The outcome of the team work-shop was that safety improvements were identified that could easily halve the risk of serious injury to people visiting and moving through central Grey St.

Key safety improvements included treatments that helped to manage vehicle speeds, such as raised platforms, gateway treatments, road narrowing, textured surfacing and additional measures.

In fact the Hamilton East team clearly are looking for transformational change – they have a tick for every box.

The ticking of every box is the right thing to do; this allows different treatments to act together to give the greatest overall benefit.
Here are concept drawings showing how different treatments could give a reduction in the risk of fatality or serious injury of up to 75% for many road users.

Lastly page 14 of the Technical Report tells us we can do better than 75% safer:
“Typically this requires speeds below 30 km/h to avoid death if a collision occurs, or even lower speeds (around 20 km/h) to avoid serious injury. For a speed choice of 30 km/h instead of 50 km/h, the estimated reduction in fatal crash risk is 95%”

But this would be a political decision as it was in Helsinki in the 1990s. “The optimal speed limit on an urban street is the lowest limit the political decision makers can accept”

Link to report – Safe System infrastructure on mixed use arterials