Category Archives: Roading

Dekra counts 922 cities free of traffic deaths

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“Vision Zero”: this strategy, which was originally developed in Sweden, means 100% safe arrivals and zero road fatalities.

Many towns and cities have achieved this aim in recent years, in Europe, the United States and Japan. Here is link to map – http://www.dekra-vision-zero.com/map/

The Dekra road safety report 2017 (p29) identified 922 towns/cities with over 50,000 inhabitants that recorded at least one year with zero traffic fatalities between 2009 and 2015, while 16 towns/cities recorded six or seven years with zero traffic fatalities. For towns/cities with over 100,000 inhabitants, the figures since 2009 are as follows: 193 towns/cities recorded at least one year with zero traffic fatalities between 2009 and 2015 and three towns/cities recorded five years with zero traffic fatalities. And in towns/cities with over 200,000 inhabitants, 29 towns/cities recorded at least one year with zero traffic fatalities between 2009 and 2015 and three towns/cities recorded four years with zero traffic fatalities.

In Hamilton NZ, we have had a year free of traffic deaths since 2000. But sadly we haven’t had a target to have everyone home safe and healthy, every day, and with no exceptions

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And lets not forget NZ Easter Holiday 2012 Zero & NZ Queen’s Birthday 2013 Zero

References:

Dekra road safety report 2017 – page 29

Access Hamilton safety action plan 2010 – page 26

HCC Growth and Infrastructure 9 May 17 – page 35

 

Drivers of heavy vehicles un-supported by Safe Journeys

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For truck drivers, an 80 km/h speed limit has the potential to save at least 20 to 32 lives per year

Improving the safety of heavy vehicles – What is the problem?

Safer Journey Strategy page 28

  • In 2008, crashes involving heavy vehicles (HVs) accounted for 18% of road deaths and 9% of total injuries. This equates to 65 deaths, 258 serious injuries and 1,144 minor injuries.
  • About 80% of people killed in heavy vehicle-related crashes are other road users.

Table data from Quarterly road toll report Jan 2017 to Mar 2017 http://www.transport.govt.nz/research/roadtoll/

What has Safe Journeys improved for drivers of Heavy Vehicles (HVs) in New Zealand?

In 2010 HVs were involved in 71 of 379 deaths (18.7%)

In 2017 HVs have been involved in 91 deaths (rolling 12 month) of 332 annual road fatalities: 27% of road deaths.

Benchmark this against the 2016 German crash facts.

German drivers of HVs suffered 137 deaths out of 3,155 persons killed on German traffic: 4.3% of road deaths.

There are a lot of trucks on German Autobahns, but there also helpful safety rules.

The Autobahn has an advisory speed limit of 130 km/h. While going faster is not illegal, in the case of an accident, the driver is deemed at least partially responsible due to “increased operating danger”.

Vehicles with a top speed of less than 60 km/h are not allowed to use the autobahn.

For HVs (Goods Vehicles) over 3.5 t the maximum speed is 80 km/h. In New Zealand it is 90 km/h. Wiki Speed limits in Germany

Countries where the maximum  speed is 80 km/h for ‘Single carriageway’: China, Demark, Finland (winter), France (rain), India, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan.

Countries where the maximum speed for trucks is 80km/h or less: Argentina, Brazil, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Singapore, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey.

Wiki Speed limits by country

“ If open road mean speeds dropped by 5 km/h, 60 lives per year would be saved” (Page 22, safe systems) Safer Journey Strategy

To repeat: for truck drivers, an 80 km/h speed limit has the potential to save at least 20 to 32 lives per year.