Category Archives: Roading

A good one-way cycle lane width

Readers need to be aware that this post does have a bias toward giving weaker road users a higher priority for road space. My reading of these design manuals is therefore to identify the widths suitable for people new to biking [Answer is 2.01m+]. Close examination of these guides shows there are minimum widths stated. Please take care if you are looking for minimum values; we know from reading NZTA report 389 that “Narrower cycle lanes [are] three to four times less safe than wider cycle lanes.”

Copenhagen guidelines for the design of road projects – Focus on cycling  (file size 17,954 KB)

Chapter 2 Cycle tracks: Minimum width of a Copenhagen cycle track is 2.2 m

On individual sections, where there is only enough space for a very narrow cycle track (1.7-1.8 m), the cycle track may be installed if planners decide that cyclist safety, security and passability taken as a whole would be improved in relation to the current situation.

The Netherlands – CROW Design manual for a cycle-friendly infrastructure 1996 (Table 4.3*)

A one-way cycle-track of 2.00 m or narrower is not a good cycling-facility [2.01m+ is good]. This is so that cyclists have the possibility of taking evasive action during passing or overtaking manoeuvres.

(photo Koblenz)

Berlin 10 aims because berlin is turning  Aim 2: A 2m width for bicycle lanes on all main roads

The width of bicycle lanes needs to provide sufficient space for safe overtaking manoeuvres.

For more on Berlin here is link to blog post from Copenhagenize – Berlin new hope

Dekra counts 922 cities free of traffic deaths

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“Vision Zero”: this strategy, which was originally developed in Sweden, means 100% safe arrivals and zero road fatalities.

Many towns and cities have achieved this aim in recent years, in Europe, the United States and Japan. Here is link to map – http://www.dekra-vision-zero.com/map/

The Dekra road safety report 2017 (p29) identified 922 towns/cities with over 50,000 inhabitants that recorded at least one year with zero traffic fatalities between 2009 and 2015, while 16 towns/cities recorded six or seven years with zero traffic fatalities. For towns/cities with over 100,000 inhabitants, the figures since 2009 are as follows: 193 towns/cities recorded at least one year with zero traffic fatalities between 2009 and 2015 and three towns/cities recorded five years with zero traffic fatalities. And in towns/cities with over 200,000 inhabitants, 29 towns/cities recorded at least one year with zero traffic fatalities between 2009 and 2015 and three towns/cities recorded four years with zero traffic fatalities.

In Hamilton NZ, we have had a year free of traffic deaths since 2000. But sadly we haven’t had a target to have everyone home safe and healthy, every day, and with no exceptions

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And lets not forget NZ Easter Holiday 2012 Zero & NZ Queen’s Birthday 2013 Zero

References:

Dekra road safety report 2017 – page 29

Access Hamilton safety action plan 2010 – page 26

HCC Growth and Infrastructure 9 May 17 – page 35